Mark Twain Books




Mark Twain



Easton Press Mark Twain books:
The Notorious Jumping Frog and Other Stories - 1970
Pudd'nhead Wilson - 1974
Life on The Mississippi - 1979
The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn - 1981
A Connecticut Yankee in King Arthur's Court - 1983
The Prince and The Pauper

The Complete works of Mark Twain (12 volume set) including titles:
The Prince and The Pauper
Pudd'nhead Wilson
Tom Sawyer Abroad
The Notorious Jumping Frog & Other Stories
The Innocents Abroad
The £1, 000, 000 Bank-Note & Other Stories
A Connecticut Yankee in King Arthur's Court
Life on The Mississippi
The Adventures of Tom Sawyer
Roughing It
A Tramp Abroad
The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn

Deluxe Editions in slip cases:
A Connecticut Yankee in King Arthur's Court
The Prince and The Paupe


Franklin Library Mark Twain books:
The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn - 100 Greatest Books of All Time - 1975
Adventures of Tom Sawyer - 100 Greatest Masterpieces of American Literature - 1977
Adventures of Huckleberry Finn - World's Best Loved Books - 1978
Adventures of Tom Sawyer - World's Best Loved Books - 1978
Life on The Mississippi - 100 Greatest Masterpieces of American Literature - 1981
Life on The Mississippi - World's Best Loved Books - 1982
Huckleberry Finn - 100 Greatest Masterpieces of American Literature - 1983
The Man that Corrupted Hadleyburg and other stories - Collected Stories of the World's Greatest Writers - 1985



Samuel Langhorne Clemens, (1835-1910), was an American writer, better known under his pseudonym, Mark Twain. He was born in Florida, Mo., and when he was four years old his family took up residence in Hannibal, Mo. There he received a common school education. After his father's death in 1847, young Mark Twain became a printers apprentice and later wrote for Hannibal Journal, a newspaper owned by his brother Orion. Subsequently Mark Twain was a journeyman printer and then a steamboat pilot on the Mississippi River, until the Civil War put an end to travel on the river. In 1861, after serving for a short time as a Confederate volunteer, he went to the Territory of Nevada, where he worked in the silver mines. In 1862 Mark Twain became a reporter on the Virginia City (Nevada) Enterprise and in 1863 began signing his articles with the pen name "Mark Twain", a phrase meaning "two fathoms deep" which was used by leadsmen of Mississippi River boats in taking soundings. The following year Mark Twain went to California, where he soon took up residence in San Francisco and became part of the group of noted writers, including Bret Harte and Artemus Ward, who contributed to the Golden Era, a celebrated newspaper and literary journal of the time. In 1865 the publication in the New York Saturday Press of Mark Twain's humorous sketch of frontier life, The Celebrated Jumping Frog of Calaveras County, brought him national recognition as a writer. The sketch was republished in his first book.

Mark Twain lectured in New York City and elsewhere, and in 1867 visited France, Italy, and the Holy Land. He wrote his travels in Innocents Abroad, published in 1869, a book in which he showed lack of reverence for certain aspects of European culture which usually impress an American tourist. In 1870 Mark Twain married Olivia L. Langdon and established himself in Hartford, Conn. Much of his best work was written from 1869 to 1889, including Roughing It (1872), an account of his early adventures as a miner and journalist; The Gilded Age (with Charles Dudley Warner, 1873), a satire on post-Civil War days; The Adventures of Tom Sawyer, published in 1876, a story of boyhood adventure in a town on the Mississippi River; A Tramp Abroad (1880), an account of a walking trip through the Black Forest of Germany and the Swiss Alps; The Prince and the Pauper (1882), a satire on the social evils of England in Tudor times; Life on the Mississippi, published in1883, an autobiographical account chiefly of Mark Twain's experiences as a river pilot; The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn, published in 1884, a sequel to Tom Sawyer; A Connecticut Yankee at King Arthur's Court, published in 1889, a satire on feudal England; and other works.

In 1884 Mark Twain became a partner in the publishing firm of Charles L. Webster and Co., which profitably published the Memoirs of General Grant and the Life of Pope Leo X111. Subsequently, however, the firm went into bankruptcy (1894) and in 1896 Mark Twain made a lecture tour of the world to pay of his debts. Following the Equator (1897) describes the tour. His work during the 1890,s and 1900,s is characterized by a feeling of pessimism and bitterness and on the whole shows a loss of freshness and invention. The best of Mark Twain's works of this period are The Tragedy of Pudd'nhead Wilson (1894) and Personal Recollections of Joan of Arc (1896). Others of his later writings are The Man That Corrupted Hadleyburg (1899), What is Man? (1906), and The Mysterious Stranger (posthumously published, 1916). Mark Twain's Autobiography was published in 1924.

Mark Twain's best work is characterized by broad, irreverent humor, realism, love of democracy, and hatred of sham oppression. His was a voice of social protest at a time when American life was in the grip of the conventionalism and Philistinism of the epoch of industrial expansion following the Civil War. His work, representing equalitarian spirit of the unconventional West, marked the end of the domination of American literature by New England writers. Mark Twain became renowned as a humorist, but his chief claim to fame as a artist on the books which delineate the life of the Mississippi valley in the middle of the 19th century, particularly life on the Mississippi, Tom Sawyer, and Huckleberry Finn, generally considered as his masterpiece. Mark Twain was a world celebrity during the later part of his life; he is still widely read in the U.S. and abroad, and is regarded as one of the most Characteristic and important of American writers.







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