Henry James


Henry James

Easton Press Henry James books

Washington Square - 1971
The Turn of The Screw - 1977
The Portrait of a Lady - 1978
The Ambassadors - 197
9


Six volume set including:
The Ambassadors
The Bostonians
The Europeans
The Turn of The Screw
The Golden Bowl
Washington Square


Franklin Library Henry James books

Nine Tales by Henry James - 100 Greatest Books of All Time - 1977
The Ambassadors - Greatest Books of the Twentieth Century - 1979
Selected Tales of Henry James - 100 Greatest Masterpieces of American Literature - 1979
The Ambassadors - 100 Greatest Books of All Time - 1980
The Ambassadors - 100 Greatest Masterpieces of American Literature - 1981
The Portrait of a Lady - World's Best Loved Books - 1983
Seven Tales by Henry James - Collected Stories of the World's Greatest Writers - 1983
Selected Tales  - World's Best Loved Books - 1984
Ghostly Tales - Library of Mystery Masterpieces - 1989



The Ambassadors
Henry James books

Author Henry James

Henry James, one of the most influential American novelists and literary figures of the 19th and early 20th centuries, was born on April 15, 1843, in New York City. He came from a prominent and intellectually inclined family; his father, Henry James Sr., was a theologian and philosopher, and his brother, William James, became a renowned psychologist and philosopher. Henry James spent a significant portion of his childhood in Europe, receiving an education in both America and Switzerland. This early exposure to different cultures and societies would later influence his writing, as many of his works explore the complexities of social dynamics and cultural clashes. He attained his education in New York, London England, Paris and Geneva. In 1875 he took residence in England and subsequently only returned to the United States for vacations. He became a British citizen in 1915.

James began his literary career as a contributor to various periodicals, honing his craft before publishing his first novel, Watch and Ward, in 1871. This resulted in the American author William Dean Howells encouraging him and introducing his works to the magazine The Atlantic Monthly. His work is characterized by leisurely pacing and subtle delineation of character rather than by dramatic incidents or complicated plots. However, it was with novels like Daisy Miller (1878) and The Portrait of a Lady (1881) that James gained widespread recognition. His works often delved into the psychological intricacies of his characters and scrutinized the societal expectations placed upon them. Notable for his refined and intricate prose style, James is perhaps best known for his later novels, including The Ambassadors (1903) and The Wings of the Dove (1902). These works are characterized by intricate plots, subtle explorations of characters' inner lives, and a deep psychological insight. His major works, highly sensitive examples of the objective psychological novel, describe the world of leisure and sophistication he grew to know intimately in England and Europe. In Henry James' early novels he dealt with the impact of European culture on American traveling and living abroad. Examples of this phase, written between 1875 and 1881, are Roderick Hudson, Washington Square, Portrait of a Lady, and The American Daisy Miller.

James also wrote several successful novellas, such as The Turn of the Screw (1898), a classic ghost story that blends horror and psychological suspense. His exploration of unreliable narrators and ambiguous realities in this work has made it a subject of ongoing critical analysis and interpretation.

During his lifetime, Henry James divided his time between Europe and the United States, developing a keen understanding of the cultural differences between the Old World and the New. This transatlantic perspective influenced many of his novels, as he grappled with the evolving nature of American identity and the clash between American innocence and European sophistication. Henry James's later years were marked by a series of plays and essays, showcasing his versatility as a writer. He received recognition for his contributions to literature, including the Order of Merit from King George V in 1915.

The Spoils of Poynton, and The Awkward Age, all written from 1889 to 1900. The last great novels by Henry James, written between 1901 and 1904, The Ambassadors, The Wings of the Dove, and The Golden Bowl, take up once again the issue of different views between Europeans and Americans. The later works of Henry James are generally work complex than his earlier works, and the later characters and scenes seem to only exist in the minds of other characters.

Henry James passed away on February 28, 1916, in London, leaving behind a rich literary legacy. His exploration of the complexities of human relationships, nuanced character studies, and innovative narrative techniques have solidified his status as a master of the novel and a key figure in the transition from 19th-century realism to 20th-century modernism.



The Ambassadors Henry James








Henry James was a prolific author, and one or more of his books were published every year up to his death in 1916. The many other books and stories of Henry James include:
French Poets and Novelists - 1878
An International Episode - 1879
The Author of Beltraffio - 1885
The Bostonians - 1886
The Princess Casamassima - 1886
What Massie Knew - 1897
In The Cage - 1898
The Soft Side - 1900
The Sacred Fount - 1901
The Better Sort - 1903
The Finer Grain - 1910
The Outcry - 1911
A Small Boy and Others - 1913
Notes of a Son and Brother - 1914
Notes on Novelists - 1914




No comments:

Post a Comment

Share your best book review and recommendation


Best books in order by author list:

A    B    C    D    E    F    G    H    I    J    K    L    M    N    O    P    Q    R    S    T    U    V    W    X    Y    Z






Privacy Policy        |        Terms and Disclosure        |        Contact        |        About        |        Best Book Categories        |        Framed Tributes

© 2002 - 2024 Leather Bound Treasure