Jack London
Leather Bound Books
Easton Press  
White Fang - 1973
The Sea Wolf  - 1979
The Call of The Wild - 1980
The Great Short Stories of Jack London
The Cruise of the Snark - 2003

Franklin Library  
The Call of The Wild - 100 Greatest Masterpieces of American Literature - 1977
The Sea Wolf - World's Best Loved Books - 1980
Tales of the Northland - Collected Stories of the World's Greatest Writers - 1983
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Jack London was an American author, born in San Francisco under the given names John Griffith. Jack London's formal education of a year in high school and a few months at the University of California. From the age of fifteen to twenty two London was in turn a seaman, a tramp, a seeker of gold in the Klondike, and a militant socialist; he was a newspaper correspondent during the Russo-Japanese War (1904-05) and in Mexico (1914). Jack London's literary career commenced in 1898 with the sale of a number of magazine stories; his first book, a collection of stories, was The Son of the Wolf (1900). Jack London went on to write over forty books, including novels, short stories, and miscellaneous books. His fictional books, in which the central character is usually a man of simple, primitive, and vigorous character, are marker by powerful realism, romantic feeling, and humanitarian sentiment. His books (novels unless otherwise characterized) include The God of his Fathers (1901), Short stories of the Klondike; A Daughter of the Snows (1902); The Call of the Wild (1903), a famous tale of the reversion of a tamed dog to a savage state; The Sea Wolf (1904), a tale of wild adventure; Tales of the Fish Patrol (1905), short stories of adventure; The Game (1905), a tragic tale of the prise ring; The Iron Heel (1908), which prophesied the coming of fascism; Martin Eden (1909); The Abysmal Brute (1913), another tale about pugilism; John Barleycorn (1913), an autobiographical account of the author's struggle against alcoholism; The Valley of the Moon (1913) in which Jack London set forth his Socialist ideas; The Star Rover (1915), a novel concerning reincarnation; and Jerry of the Islands (posthumously published, 1917), a tale of an Irish setter. Among others of Jack London books are a book of Socialist essays, The War of the Classes (1905), and a sociological study of life in the poverty stricken East End section of the city of London, The People of the Abyss (1913).